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UNC Students: “Ladies Night” Promotions Are Sexist And Should End

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UNC seniors say "Ladies Night" promotes sexism and objectifies women. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

UNC seniors say “Ladies Night” promotes sexism and objectifies women. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

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CHARLOTTE (CBS Charlotte) – “Ladies Nights” are inherently sexist and need to stop, say a pair of students at University of North Carolina.

UNC seniors Rob Sekay and Trevor Dougherty work as DJs at bars and night clubs around Chapel Hill.

And though they make money off the active night life, they are speaking out against the practice of letting women in free to various paid venues.

“I don’t think a lot of women really realize that they are actually the product being sold,” Sekay told the student newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel. “By advertising ladies night or by offering no cover to women, that tells the male audience that this is where all the women are going to be. And not only is that objectifying the women, but it’s also commodifying them as well, which is pretty harsh.”

Dougherty told the paper he decided to speak out after seeing a woman at a bar complain when the DJ played the song “Blurred Lines” by Robin Thicke. Feminist activists say the song promotes a rape culture by objectifying women.

“The biggest thing I want would be to start a conversation with the people who control the night culture in Chapel Hill,” said Dougherty. “These nights are about the music and the party and the experience,” he added. “The hookup culture people might enjoy, but that’s secondary.”

Some bar owners in Chapel Hill say they are sympathetic to Sekay and Dougherty, but don’t plan to get rid of “Ladies Nights” anytime soon.

“When our customers start complaining, I’ll do something. But until then, everybody’s copacetic with it,” said Rob Davis, who manages a bar that is popular with UNC students. “For us, it’s just purely from a business standpoint,” he said. “If girls are in your bar, guys come in. The DJs might have a problem with it, but the guys don’t.”

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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