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Study: Women Wake Up Grumpier Than Men

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File photo of people sleeping. (credit: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)

File photo of people sleeping. (credit: Carl Court/AFP/Getty Images)

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RALEIGH, N.C. (CBS Charlotte) — A new study has found that women wake up grumpier than men in the morning.

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center finds that women who get poor sleep have greater psychological distress and are more likely to suffer from heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

“This is the first empirical evidence that supports what we have observed about the role of gender and its effects upon sleep and health,” Edward Suarez, an associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke and the study’s lead author, said in a press release. “The study suggests that poor sleep – measured by the total amount of sleep, the degree of awakening during the night, and most importantly, how long it takes to get to sleep – may have more serious health consequences for women than for men.”

Researchers studied 210 middle-aged men and women who were non-smokers and had no history of sleep disorders. The study revealed that 40 percent of the participants were poor sleepers, having frequent problems falling asleep, waking up during the night or taking more than 30 minutes to fall asleep. But researchers found that the sleep problems women had put them at greater health risk than men.

“We found that for women, poor sleep is strongly associated with high levels of psychological distress, and greater feelings of hostility, depression and anger,” Suarez said in a press release. “In contrast, these feelings were not associated with the same degree of sleep disruption in men.”

Suarez believes the sleep differences between men and women hinges on a number of naturally occurring substances in the body.

The study appears online in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity.

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2011 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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